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…that according to the riches of his glory he may grant you to be strengthened with power through his Spirit in your inner being, 17 so that Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith–that you, being rooted and grounded in love, 18 may have strength to comprehend with all the saints what is the breadth and length and height and depth, 19 and to know the love of Christ that surpasses knowledge, that you may be filled with all the fullness of God. – (Ephesians 3-16-19 ESV)

 

The love of Christ surpasses our understanding. This kind of spiritual comprehension is revelatory in nature. It supernaturally touches both our mind and emotions. God’s love fills us with unspeakable joy.

Recently, I was pondering on the possibility that many Christians today are avoiding God. And, that we often seek to hide from Him behind our religious activities. I was reflecting on the endless Bible studies and sermons that speak to our intellect, more than to our hearts. All of these activities are important, but the goal of spiritual knowledge is to come to know God more intimately.

The Scripture was meant to teach us sound Biblical doctrine, and to renew our minds. But, it takes the Word of God and the Holy Spirit to bring about spiritual transformation in our lives.

God has given us the Holy Spirit, but it’s our responsibility to learn to fellowship with Him.

I see two major drifts in certain spiritual movements, that trouble me. One group focuses on a demonstration of the power of God. And that’s a good thing, as long we allow the Holy Spirit to deal with our character flaws. Also, a more intellectual movement that seeks to study Biblical theology, at the expense of God’s presence. Obviously, there are exceptions in the body of Christ to both of these groups.

It’s not sufficient to know what the Apostle Paul knew, without experiencing God as he did. Our study of Biblical doctrine will only come alive as we seek to experience God for ourselves. I thought the quote below by A.W. Tozer concerning Paul summed up my point well. It speaks of those who study truth but neglect to seek God’s presence.

“For them, the truth becomes a veil to hide the face of God; for Paul, it was a door into His very Presence. Paul’s spirit was that of the loving explorer. He was a prospector among the hills of God searching for the gold of personal spiritual acquaintance. Many today stand by Paul’s doctrine who will not follow him in his passionate yearning for divine reality. Can these be said to be Pauline in any but the most nominal sense?”

Tozer, A. W.. Keys to the Deeper Life. Pioneer Library. Kindle Edition.